A little over four years ago, I found myself in rural Mexico on a beautiful biodynamic farm called Rancho La Paz that grew herbs for medicinal teas and remedies. The farmers practiced permaculture, a holistic method of agriculture that is self-sustaining. The bees, the composting worms, the mushroom greenhouse, the water catchment pond – all working in concert with each other to ensure thrive-ability.  This sacred place brought me to my knees with wonder and awe. The flame inside of belly began to roar and the hairs on my neck began to tingle. This place. This incredibly beautiful, lush place contained an essence I have been chasing all my life. It was after that trip that my dabbling in herbal healing truly began, and I can see now that that visit served as a powerful catalyst in my life and what has led me to here – with you. The Dabblist community of curious, knowledgeable, beautiful people who want to learn and share what makes their fire burn bright and neck hairs tingle. Here’s my moment of gratitude for all that has brought me here with you.

rancho la paz

But I’m really here to talk about honey. The owner of that beautiful farm (who also happens to be a doctor in Mexico City) was proudly showing me the native honeybee hives and giving me a taste of their exquisitely sweet honey when he said, “Honey is Nature’s Medicine.”

Yes, I totally agree. Raw honey contains powerful healing enzymes, enhances absorption of nutrients in your body, and is super antioxidant. And the beauty of it all is that our incredible bee friends, whom we heavily rely on to keep our agriculture system going, provide this sweet medicine. Hopefully you have heard about the very real threat that is facing our pollinator friends, and choose raw (unheated) honey from a local beekeeping source. I promise you it tastes better, is better for you, and supports your local, courageous beekeeping movement to prevent total colony collapse.

You can add herbs to honey to pump up the medicinal volume of your culinary adventures. I add honey to my tea, drizzle it over greek yogurt, and sometimes just eat a spoonful in the morning after my green smoothie.

Like herbal oil, there are several methods for infusing your honey with herbs. This time around, I’ll show you the slower method – using the sun and the power of time to infuse your honey. I’m making a honey with anti-inflammatory calendula, carminative lavender, with a touch of soothing elderflower. This is a tummy taming honey.

I hope you enjoy the video!

Herbal Honey with Calendula, Lavender, & Elderflower

Combine your dried herbs in cheesecloth, and secure with string. Pour your honey into the jar you want to use to infuse (be sure it’s thoroughly clean). Place your herb tea bag in the honey and gently push down to be sure it’s fully submerged. Place jar in a sunny window sill (or outside on an area that gets a lot of sun) and let sit for 3-5 days. Be sure to secure the jar with a lid (sorry I didn’t do this for the video, oops!). When ready, gently remove the herbs from your honey and squeeze out all the extras. Label and enjoy!

(Video by Jamie Oliveira)

 

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2 Comments

2 Responses to (Video) Making Herbal Honey

  1. Another fantastic video, Becca! I love this idea – would be lovely in a face mask ;)
    Oh and Happy Birthday!!

  2. becca says:

    Thank you, Susanne! I think I will work on an herbal honey face masque now…thanks for the inspiration!

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